MEDIA CONTACT INFORMATION
Jill Bronaugh
Communication Manager
Office of the State Fire Marshal
800 SW Jackson, Suite 104
Topeka, KS 66612-1216
785-296-3403
jill.p.bronaugh@ks.gov
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Press Releases

Fire Prevention Week 2015: Oct. 4-10

OSFM | Sep 30, 2015

TGovernor Brownback signs Fire Prevention Week proclamationhe Office of the State Fire Marshal, Safe Kids Kansas, and Governor Brownback are joining with the National Fire Prevention Association and fire service agencies throughout the State and U.S. to dedicate the week of October 4-10, 2015 as Fire Prevention Week. 

The theme for this year’s Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 4-10, will be “Hear the Beep Where you Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!”, reminding residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement.

“In a fire, seconds count,” said Doug Jorgensen, State Fire Marshal. “In Kansas, nearly two-thirds of home fire deaths result from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Home smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out.”

According to statistics gathered through the National Fire Incident Reporting System, 64% of Kansas home fire deaths during 2014 resulted from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Meanwhile, nationally three out of five fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

Click on this banner to go to NFPA's Fire Prevention Week resources:

Fire Prevention Week

Resources 

For Parents
For Teachers
For Older Adults
For Kansas Fire Service

NFPA offers Fire Prevention Week message in American Sign Language

“Children need to know how to respond to the sound of a smoke alarm,” said Cherie Sage, Safe Kids Kansas. “Teach them to get low and get out when they hear it. A child who is coached properly ahead of time will have a better chance to get out of danger safely, so practice your escape plan regularly as a family. “

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
  • Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all do.
  • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly.
  • Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.
  • If the smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside. Go to your outside meeting place.
  • Call the fire department from outside the home.

Fire departments throughout Kansas will be hosting activities during Fire Prevention Week to promote “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!” Through these educational, family-oriented activities, residents can learn more about the importance of having a working smoke alarm in every bedroom.

In 2014, Kansas fire departments responded to 2,933 residential fires, and these fires resulted in 109 civilian injuries and 25 civilian deaths, 66 firefighter injuries and $58 million in direct damage

A key way to prevent home fires now and in the future is to teach children the dangers of fire and how to react in case of a fire. The Office of the State Fire Marshal and Safe Kids Kansas offer these fire safety tips for kids:

  • Teach kids never to play with matches and lighters. Make a habit of placing these items up and away from young children.
  • Create and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of your house in case of a fire. Get a stopwatch and time how fast your family can escape. The kids will love it. Create a map of your home to help plan escape routes.  You can find a map worksheet to get you started at SafeKids.org or NFPA.org.
  • Children should know how to respond to the sound of a smoke alarm. Teach them to get low and get out when they hear it. A child who is coached properly ahead of time will have a better chance to be safe.
  • Watch the video “Start Safe: Learn how to plan and practice home fire drills with your children” so your family will know how to be prepared and get to safety if a fire occurs in your home.